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Saturday, October 31, 2015

India Tourism: Five Beautiful beach in Goa






Forget the beaches of Australia, Thailand, Indonnesia and head to some of the most amazing beaches of Goa, India.

Goa is a travelers' paradise, Fanny adds taste. Wide beaches, courteous hospitality,
tasty sea fish and assortments make the journey enjoyable. In our list, We doscuss there are total five best beaches of Goa for your’s vacation.

1.         Mandrem Beach
Situated in North Goa, Mandrem is a tranquil beach and counted among the most beautiful beaches in Asia. Serene and scenic, Mandrem is preferred by honeymooners. The secluded beach provides the much needed privacy for the honeymooners. A sleepy small village, there is nothing much to do in Mandrem. Laze around on the beach or take a swim in the clear waters or visit the eateries to enjoy local food, Mandrem is ideal for do-nothing vacation.

2.         Agonda Beach
Counted among the most scenic beaches in Asia, Agonda Beach is serene and clean beach. It is ideal if you want to spend time meditating, catch up on your reading or simply, enjoying the sun. Agonda is relatively less crowded than the other beaches of Goa. And that means lesser crowds, more privacy and loads of opportunities to enjoy solitude. If you crave for some activity, jump on a country boat and go dolphin spotting. Cabo de rama and Cola beach are also worth a visit.

3.         Baga Beach

One of the most popular tourist spots in Goa, India . Baga is known for its beach parties, nightlife and amazing seafood served at its beach shacks and restaurants. During tourist season, the beach is line with rows of shacks. It is famous for its water sports and dolphin cruises. If interested in wind surfing Baga beach also offers an opportunity to enjoy Wind Surfing between January and March. National Wind Surfing Championship is also conducted every year around September – November at the Baga beach.

4.         Candolim Beach

Situated very close to Baga, Candolim’s beach is counted amongst the most beautiful beaches in India. Under the shadow of popular beaches like Baga and Calangute , Candolim escapes the hordes that visit Goa during peak season.
Candolim village has another reason to fame. It was the first village to convert to Christianity in the 16th century.

5.         Cavelossim Beach
Situated at the mouth of Sal River, Cavelossim beach is serene, flanked by paddy fields and coconut groves. As most tourists head for the more popular beaches, Cavelossim witnesses less crowds. Its contrasting black rocks and white sand make it a delightful beach for a pleasant evening.

Finally Goa is very clean, quite catholic (important for some people) and very cheap oof the season. There are so many beaches in north and south part, so you can choose what you want - quiet or busy and lively beach

Friday, October 30, 2015

Incredible India: Mehrangarh Fort, a magnificant tourist place in India





Mehrangarh Fort located in Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India. This is one of the largest forts in India. This fort built around 1460 by Rao Jodha. The fort is Located 120 metres (400 ft) above the city and is enclosed by grand thick walls. Inside the fort boundaries there are several palaces known for their intricate carvings and expansive courtyards. A winding road leads to and from the city below. The imprints of cannonball hits by attacking armies of Jaipur can still be seen on the second gate. To the left of the fort is the chhatri of Kirat Singh Soda, a soldier who fell on the spot defending the Mehrangarh fort.

There are 07 gates, which include Jayapol (meaning 'victory'), built by Maharaja Man Singh to commemorate his victories over Jaipur and Bikaner armies. Fattehpol (also meaning 'victory') gate was made by Maharaja Ajit Singh to mark the defeat of the Mughals. The palm imprints upon these still attract much attention it is very proudes for rao rajputs.

The museum in the Mehrangarh fort is one of the most well-stocked museums in Rajasthan, India. In one section of the fort museum there is a selection of old royal palanquins, including the elaborate domed gilt Mahadol palanquin which was won in a battle from the Governor of Gujarat in 1730. The museum exhibits the heritage of the Rathores in arms, costumes, paintings and decorated period rooms.


Rao Jodha, the chief of the Rathore clan, is credited with the origin of Jodhpur in India. He founded Jodhpur in 1459 (Jodhpur was previously known as Marwar). He was one of Ranmal's 24 sons became the fifteenth Rathore ruler. One year after his accession to the throne, Jodha decided to move his capital to the safer location of Jodhpur, as the one thousand years old Mandore fort was no longer considered to provide sufficient security.

With the trusted aid of Rao Nara (son of Rao Samra), the Mewar forces were subdued at Mandore. With that, Rao Jodha gave Rao Nara the title of Diwan. With the help of Rao Nara, the foundation of the fort was laid on 1/ May 1459 by Jodha on a rocky hill 9 kilometres (5.6 mi) to the south of Mandore. This hill was known as Bhaurcheeria, the mountain of birds. According to legend to build the fort he had to displace the hill's sole human occupant, a hermit called Cheeria Nathji, the lord of birds. Upset at being forced to move Cheeria Nathji cursed Rao Jodha with "Jodha! May your citadel ever suffer a scarcity of water!". Rao Jodha managed to appease the hermit by building a house and a temple in the fort very near the cave the hermit had used for meditation, though only to the extent that even today the area is plagued by a drought every 3 to 4 years. Jodha then took an extreme measure to ensure that the new site proved propitious; he buried a man called "Raja Ram Meghwal" alive in the foundations. "Raja Ram Meghwal" was promised that in return his family would be looked after by the Rathores. To this day his descendants still live in Raj Bagh, "Raja Ram Meghwal's" Garden, an estate bequeathed them by Jodha.



Mehrangarh (etymology: 'Mihir' (Sanskrit) -sun or Sun-deity; 'garh' (Sanskrit)-fort; i.e.'Sun-fort'); according to Rajasthani language pronunciation conventions,'Mihirgarh' has changed to 'Mehrangarh'; the Sun-deity has been the chief deity of the Rathore dynasty. Though the fortress was originally started in 1459 by Rao Jodha, founder of Jodhpur, most of the fort which stands today dates from the period of Jaswant Singh of Marwar (1638–1678). The fort is located at the centre of the city spreading over 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) on top of a high hill. Its walls, which are up to 36 metres (118 ft) high and 21 metres (69 ft) wide, protect some of the most beautiful and historic palaces in Rajsthan.